A message to Peninsula locals

Have you used a service around Devonport recently? If you paid good money for a service, you’d expect to get what you paid for, right?

Cleaning houses, cutting hair, home renovations, repairing your car…these are all examples of common services that many households around Devonport regularly use.

But what happens if a service doesn’t turn out the way you expected? Don’t worry – you’ve got rights and I’m here to share a little more about what they are.

When a business in trade supplies you with consumer services, you are legally covered by four guarantees (or promises) under the Consumer Guarantees Act. Here’s what they are and in general terms what they mean…

Reasonable care and skill
When you hire a service provider to carry out work for you, they must do it to a competent level and with reasonable care.

Fit for a particular purpose
When you’ve told your service provider what work you want them to do and they accept the job, they must make sure you get what you were expecting.

Reasonable time
It’s always best to agree on a timeframe, but even if you don’t a service provider must complete the work in a reasonable time frame. ‘Reasonable’ is determined by the time it would take a competent person who works in that field to complete the same work.

Reasonable price 
As above, it’s always best to agree on the price before work starts, but even if you don’t a service provider must only charge a reasonable fee. ‘Reasonable’ is determined by what other providers in your area would charge for the same or similar services.

If you hire a business or trader to carry out a service that doesn’t meet any of these guarantees, you can ask them to resolve the problem. And don’t worry, even if you don’t have a written contract with the business who provided the services, you’re still covered. They’re obliged to fix their work at no extra cost. If they can’t or won’t, or it isn’t fixed within a reasonable time frame, you can ask someone else to fix it for you then pass the cost onto the original service provider. You can also cancel the contract and obtain a full refund, if the work is substantially unfit for purpose and can’t be easily fixed.

If you can’t reach an agreement about your complaint you can still take things further, such as an industry dispute resolution scheme or the Disputes Tribunal.

We hope you never have to deal with poor or faulty service – but if you do, find out more about your rights and the Consumer Guarantees Act here.

Mark Hollingsworth
Manager, Consumer Protection
Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment

Two new retail tenants at Devonport Wharf

New signs have been spotted on the closed-off retail spaces on Devonport Wharf, announcing who the new tenants will be.

Maru Sushi & Don already have two branches in Bombay and Takanini. This will be the first outlet on the North Shore. As well as a large range of sushi, the restaurant will offer hot eat-in meals including Chicken Don, Teriyaki Salmon, Pork Katsu, Chicken Karaage and Seafood Yaki Udon.

The other new tenant is Tui Gifts, a new retailer targeting the tourists arriving off the ferries.

The new shops are believed to be both launching later next month.

Iconic ocean swim event enjoys support from local businesses

A dozen local businesses donated prizes for the the annual Cheltenham Swim, an annual fixture in the calendar of ocean swimmers across the peninsula and from outside Auckland.

The 2.1km swim is run by the Devonport Swim Club which operates from the navy pool at HMNZS Philomel on Queen’s Parade.

Around 150 swimmers set off on the starter horn at 9.30 am on Saturday morning, 5th May, from Narrow Neck beach. Aided by the current, the quickest swimmers were out of the water and bounding up Balmain Reserve on Cheltenham Beach in less than 22 minutes.

The annual Cheltenham Swim and the Round North Head Classic swim, held in November, have established a reputation over the years as being very well organised, and particularly friendly events, with little of the aggressive jostling often seen at larger ocean swim meets. This is also to do with the mix of entrants, which include many local swimmers out to enjoy a scenic swim around the coast.

Sponsors this year included Baked Devonport, Vondel restaurant, Skin Sense, Makoto Japanese restaurant, Cosi fan tutte, The Vic Cinema , 2 degrees mobile, Glengarry Wine, Just Workout Devonport, Riba Fish n Chips, Corelli’s Café, the gift shop Nord and Devonport Hammer Hardware, who also put on a mobile warm shower.

Devonport Swim Club had been running at half steam for the past two years while the navy pool had a complete upgrade and the steep bank directly behind it secured.

Regular swim squads have only been able to run sporadically over the period as the club has had to rent lanes from Takapuna Primary School and Takapuna Grammar School. Unfortunately, the TGS pool is only swimmable in February and March as it is unheated and exposed to winds.

However with the navy pool recently open again, swim squads have filled up quickly. The junior squads were at capacity within a week of the club’s relaunch.

Brothers in Arms

From idyllic Devonport to the trenches of France, take in the wartime stories of Alban, Ernest and Gainor and Gainor’s brother-in-law Jack Parsons at this Takapuna Library exhibition.

With war records, notebooks, instruction manuals, sketches and commemorative quilts, three generations of the Jackson families pay tribute to these young servicemen.

At Takapuna Library, 9 The Strand.

Composite image supplied by the Jackson family.

Visitor Numbers up at Devonport Museum

Visitor numbers at the Devonport Museum have risen sharply this summer.

Although some of this may be down to the general increase in tourists, the museum revamp and subsequent publicity of the Choice TV’s programme Heritage Rescue has been the biggest driver.

People have been coming from all over Auckland and further afield to see the results of the total redesign of the museum.

The team from Heritage Rescue did a fantastic job of revitalising the displays and brightening the museum’s interior. This involved many hours of painting and shifting items in the collection to make a more cohesive and visitor-friendly museum. If you missed the on-air programmes featuring our museum you may view them on Choice-on-demand at www.choicetv.co.nz/#!/browse/tv/350/season/2/heritage-rescue. (programmes 7 and 8).

In response, the museum has been open longer hours over the summer (from 12 – 4 pm) thanks to those loyal volunteers who are on the roster*.

President of the Devonport Historical & Museum Society, Alistair Fletcher, together with Secretary Gail Griffin, have been busy on their latest project of creating a historical database of Devonport streets. At present they are documenting the movements, occupations and the history of families from the early 1900’s to late 1930’s in Allenby Avenue and Buchanan Street.

Says Alistair, “it really is like a huge jigsaw being pieced to together and it offers an invaluable insight with regards to occupations and social comment on the people who made up our community over those years.”

*Do contact Coralie (445 1900) if you or your friends could spare two hours every couple of months in the weekend to open the museum.

Morris Dancers Descend Upon Devonport

Of all the things to come across down on Windsor Reserve, Devonport.

Several dozen Morris Dancers put on an engaging spectacle for Devonport locals and tourists as they showed off their impressive capering skills on a balmy summer afternoon.

If you haven’t seen Morris Dancers in the flesh, see the video below for the next best thing.

This traditional English dance form, dating back around 500 years, is certainly quirky!
 

100 Years since Count Felix von Luckner escaped from Motuihe

On 13 December, 1917, the infamous Count Felix von Luckner interned on Motuihe Island, escaped on the Commandant’s Launch Pearl and headed for Coromandel. Three days later he managed to board and capture the scow Moa and head for the Kermadec Islands. To commemorate the centenary of his escape the Torpedo Bay Navy Museum has created an online digital exhibition of some of the artefacts that it has in its collection relating to von Luckner and his time in New Zealand.

Some of the objects are currently on display in the Museum, others are not, so this is a great opportunity to get a closer look at some interesting artefacts. Read more about the daring, yet gentlemanly raider Count Felix von Luckner and view the digital exhibition.

 

Devonstock Music Festival 2017 Showcases New Talent

Devonport locals and lucky visitors were treated to a rocking good afternoon in Windsor Reserve on Sunday 10th December.

Talented local youngsters including  several from Belmont Intermediate and Takapuna Grammar put a series of spectacular performances in which touches of vocal and instrumental genius were witnessed on occasion.

Threatening to drizzle a couple of times the balmy day stayed dry, and with food-stalls set up around the park, most people stayed all afternoon to hear the bands play out.

 

The festival is organised by local teenagers to showcase the music of young artists. This year’s lineup included the smooth, funky rhythms of Molly + The Chromatics, up and coming indie-rockers Dirty Pixels, the local hard hitters Slipstream, talented singer-songwriter FreyaTheo Sawyer’s dynamic and engaging acoustic pop, and youthful local rock combo Neon Flame.

Organised by Devonport Peninsula Trust and Devonport Youth Forum. Special thanks to Devonport-Takapuna Local Board, Depot Sound Recording Studio, Music Planet, and Phantom Billstickers for their support.

Lake Road Consultation: Update from AT

A public feedback report for Lake Road Improvements has been collated by Auckland Transport (AT). The Lake Road Improvements Feedback Report can be downloaded here.

In total, AT received 1,131 submissions.

Outcome

After careful consideration of feedback and project constraints, AT’s preferred option is for developing the medium investment approach further in the next phase, the Detailed Business Case (DBC). This phase will involve developing specific design proposals and more detailed costs and benefits.

The proposals will most likely include:

• targeting specific locations for road widening, within budgetary and spatial constraints, recognising that a major road widening project is unlikely to be cost effective but targeted widening may be necessary

• conversion of the existing bus lane along Esmonde Road to a transit lane to the ramp signals, as part of an existing investigation with the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA)

• targeted use of transit lanes along Lake Road (likely between Roberts Avenue and Napier Avenue)

• continuous cycle facilities (physically separated if possible) along Lake Road (between Seabreeze Road and Hurstmere Road), connecting to a supporting local network being investigated by AT’s Cycling team

• physically separated cycle facilities along Bayswater Avenue (between Lake Road and the ferry terminal)

• technology to assist with real time journey information (e.g. real time journey planner apps and websites, traffic advisory apps, public transport tracking app) and investigating roadside variable message signs

• improved bus/ferry integration and roll out of the New Network for the North Shore

• continued delivery of Travel Plan programmes with local schools and key organisations, in particular the Navy

• intersection improvements.

***Next steps***

Specific suggestions gathered from the public feedback will be further considered in the DBC phase. Please see the ‘Detailed suggestions from feedback’ section of this report for more detailed responses to themes and suggestions. AT will consult further with the community once specific design proposals have been developed.

AT expect to start the DBC in early in the New Year.